Tiffin Historic Trust

Tiffin Historic Trust celebrates 40 years

historic-trust-invitationThe Tiffin Historic Trust is inviting the community to celebrate with them their 40th anniversary with an open house at the Grammes-Brown House Oct. 27, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

From the Tiffin Historic Trust:

A Brief History of the Tiffin Historic Trust in Celebration of its 40th Anniversary

In the fall of 1976, during the nation’s celebration of its Bicentennial, a group of citizens met at the Tiffin-Seneca County Public Library.  Harold Hossler presided at the meeting during which Kenneth E. Davison, chairperson of the local Bicentennial Commission, made the motion to create a new organization, the Tiffin Historic Trust.  In mid-October 1976, William D. Fletcher, Mary Lewis, and Barbara J. Howe signed the Articles of Incorporation.

The stated purpose of the organization was to “promote historic preservation in Tiffin by meetings, publications, tours or whatever other means may be chosen by the corporation.”  The articles stated it would be a non-profit organization, with the goal of raising funds through grants, donations, etc., in order to promote and develop a total plan for the preservation and restoration of Tiffin, and to work with all interested groups or individuals to put this plan into effect.

172-jefferson-st-grammes-brown-house-jpgSince its founding in 1976, the Trust has done the following:

  • Compiled an inventory of Tiffin’s public and private buildings; the entries were submitted to the State and National Register of Historic Places.
  • Funded and had the city install signs designating the Historic Districts within Tiffin.
  • Worked with college interns who prepared studies of Tiffin Architecture.
  • Influenced a streetscape project that led to the Court Street design with a booklet published with grant support.
  • The Court Street Extravaganza event led to the creation of a Tiffin Heritage Festival with architecture as the theme.
  • Submitted a bridge design to the Ohio Department of Transportation and convinced them to install historically compatible replacement bridges over the Sandusky River in Tiffin.
  • Sponsored architectural workshops, seminars and conferences, including two Building Doctor Clinics.
  • Prepared various publications, including a set of walking tour brochures focusing on Tiffin neighborhoods, sidewalks, streets and alleys.
  • Created a revolving fund to assist owners with their restoration needs.
  • Established the Annual Dinner Meeting in May, during National Preservation Week/Month.
  • Created the Annual Preservation Awards program.                                                   -cont-
  • Applied for Tiffin to be an early “Main Street” community and narrowly missed being selected, until it was achieved in 2016!
  • Wrote a design review program for downtown Tiffin; although not accepted, Tiffin did eventually implement similar legislation.
  • Accepted the bequest of the Grammes-Brown House from the late Rosina Brown, restored it to its Victorian grandeur, and now use it as its headquarters and for events.
  • Purchased a threatened downtown building and later found a retail business buyer for it, thus saving it from destruction.
  • Arranged for the cleaning of the William Harvey Gibson statue in front of the Courthouse.
  • Fought to preserve major architectural buildings within Tiffin, including the East Junior High School/Old Columbian building, and the 1887 Courthouse.
  • Assisted with the preservation of the Spiva-Manley House.
  • Hosted tours of historic homes and the annual Holiday House tour.
  • Created a series of wooden replicas of historic buildings made by the Trust volunteers. The replicas, along with note cards, were an important fundraising project for many years.
  • Held summer garden tours, and Victorian teas as fundraisers.

Joint Justice Center Ground Breaking Ceremony this Friday

jjc renderingSeneca County and the City of Tiffin invite the public to attend the ground breaking ceremony for the Joint Justice Center at Courthouse Square in downtown Tiffin this Friday, July 22. The long-anticipated project is the first joint county-city court system housed under the same roof in the state of Ohio.

The ceremony will begin at 10 a.m. with the presentation of the colors by the United Veterans Council. City and county officials will also be on hand to speak and assist in the ground breaking. Parking is available in the city and county parking lots within walking distance.

The brand new 36,000 square foot facility is projected to cost about $14 million and include the city of Tiffin’s Municipal Court and Clerk of the Courts as well as the county’s Common Pleas Court, Clerk of the Courts and Probation Department. Silling Associates have been tapped for the architecture of the project while the Gilbane Building Company will cover construction management.

The first floor will be a public entrance with space for security screening, as well as offices for the title clerk and legal clerk and central holding cells.The second floor is devoted to Tiffin’s Municipal Court, with space for the courtroom, a jury deliberation room, the judge’s office suite and an office for the Clerk of Courts. The third and fourth floors are devoted to the Seneca Coutnty Common Pleas Courts, and include courtroom space, hearing rooms, jury deliberation rooms and office suites for the judges.

As construction begins, the leadership team for the project has asked the Seneca County Historical Society and the Tiffin Historic Trust to organize a group of local historic representatives to coordinate the assembly of items for a time capsule to be sealed into an interior wall of the building. During the Seneca County Fair, there will be a collection box for suggestions in the Seneca County and Seneca County Township Association Tent near the entertainment building. Suggestions also can be sent to Time capsule ideas, c/o County Commissioners, 111 Madison St., Tiffin, OH 44883 or emailed to nsmith@seneca-county.com.

“Building Doctors” Will Be Making Rounds in Tiffin July 21 and 22, 2016

Ohio History ConnectionPress release from Ohio History Connection.

This program is a partnership between SIEDC, Tiffin Historic Trust and Seneca Regional Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Services.

(COLUMBUS, OH)— The Ohio History Connection’s State Historic Preservation Office, the Seneca Industrial and Economic Development Corp., the Tiffin Historic Trust and the Seneca Regional Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Center will sponsor a Building Doctor Clinic for old-building owners in Tiffin, Ohio on July 21 and 22, 2016.

The clinic features Building Doctors Justin Cook and Richard Jarvis of the Ohio History Connection’s State Historic Preservation Office. It begins with a free seminar on Thursday evening, July 21, from 7-9 p.m. at the Tiffin–Seneca Public Library’s Frost Kalnow Room at 77 Jefferson Street in Tiffin. The seminar is open to the public and will feature guidelines for renovation projects and ways to solve some of the most common problems of buildings dating from 1800 to 1955.

On Friday, July 22 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m., the Building Doctors will visit pre-1955 buildings within five miles of Tiffin, advising owners on specific technical problems by appointment. The “doctors” examine all kinds of older buildings. Some of the things that typically call for an on-site examination include persistent peeling paint or flaking plaster, a wet basement or deteriorating masonry and plans for additions.

Justin Cook, Technical Preservation Services Manager for the Ohio History Connection’s State Historic Preservation Office, has a bachelor’s degree in classics from the University of Pittsburgh and a master’s degree in historic preservation from the University of Vermont, with post-baccalaureate studies in History and Urban and Regional Planning. He reviews applications for federal and state historic rehabilitation tax credits.

Richard Jarvis is Technical Preservation Services Manager for the Ohio History Connection’s State Historic Preservation Office. He holds a master’s degree in Conservation Studies (Historic Buildings) from The University of York (UK), a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from High Point University and an associate’s degree in Architectural Technology from Guilford Technical Community College. He reviews applications for federal and state historic rehabilitation tax credits.

The seminar and on-site consultations with the Building Doctors are free with advance registration. To register, visit www.building-doctor.org or call 800.499.2470 or 614.298.2000. You can also contact Amy Reinhart at 419.447.3831.

The Building Doctor program is made possible in part by a grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Historic Preservation Fund, administered by the Ohio History Connection’s State Historic Preservation Office. Each clinic is also made possible by support from local cosponsors.

The Ohio History Connection’s State Historic Preservation Office

The Ohio History Connection’s State Historic Preservation Office is Ohio’s official historic preservation agency. It identifies historic places in Ohio, nominates properties to the National Register of Historic Places, reviews federally-assisted projects for effects on historic, architectural, and archaeological resources in Ohio, consults on conservation of older buildings and sites and offers educational programs and publications.

Ohio Historical Society is now Ohio History Connection
On May 24, 2014, the Ohio Historical Society changed its name to the Ohio History Connection. Established in 1885, this nonprofit organization provides a wide array of statewide services and programs related to collecting, preserving and interpreting Ohio’s history, archaeology and natural history through more than 50 sites and museums across Ohio, including its flagship museum, the Ohio History Center in Columbus. For more information about programs and events, call 800.686.6124 or go online at www.ohiohistory.org.

Prescriptions from the Building Doctors:

Do’s:

  1. Check your roof and attic or upper stories for leaks at least every six months. Look for separations, bulges, cracks, and signs of moisture. It’s important to check your roof regularly. A sound roof is the key to preventing many problems which can occur below.
  1. Inspect your gutters and downspouts during a hard rain to see that they’re working properly. Keep them clean and free of leaves and obstructions which may clog them. Make sure water from downspouts is directed away from the foundation.
  1. Open your basement windows in the dry season to let air circulate. Feel basement walls for dampness. A musty odor indicates a high moisture level in the basement. Check for proper ventilation and dehumidification. Be certain that air circulates freely and isn’t blocked by materials stored against the wall.
  1. Look for loose or damaged siding. Note any areas of paint failure. Check gaps between boards. Gaps smaller than a quarter-inch will help ventilate the wall cavity; larger gaps may admit rainwater.
  1. Caulk gaps where window and door frames meet masonry or wood openings to prevent water from entering wall cavities of frame buildings or masonry of bearing-wall structures.
  1. Examine painted surfaces for signs of peeling, cracking and alligatoring. Look for clues to original painting techniques and colors. A common way to examine hidden layers of paint is to carefully sand a small area in a location where it would not have weathered or been in direct sunlight, exposing the individual layers.
  1. Assess the condition of all exterior features, particularly those of significance, such as porches, brackets and other decorative trim.
  1. Attend the Building Doctor Clinic.

Don’ts:

  1. Don’t use abrasive methods to clean brick or masonry. They can cause irreparable harm. Sandblasting, for example, removes the hard outer surface of the brick, exposing its softer core to the elements, and damages other kinds of masonry and wood, too. Avoid all techniques for cleaning masonry or wood that involves blasting or high pressure.
  1. Don’t use water-repellent coatings on masonry. They can trap moisture inside instead of letting it pass freely in and out as it normally would. When trapped moisture freezes, it expands, often forcing the surface of the brick or stone to flake or spall.
  1. Never seal basement windows shut. You’ll trap moist air inside and prevent proper air circulation, which can lead to a damp basement.
  1. Don’t plant bushes or vegetation close to the foundation. They prevent sunlight from reaching the ground, allowing moisture to accumulate there.
  1. Don’t use blown-in insulation unless you install a vapor barrier, too. Without the vapor barrier, moisture can accumulate, saturating the insulation and damaging your wall.
  1. Don’t leave unused gas pipes connected or live ends uncapped. Have gas lines professionally inspected. You can prevent a tragedy and save yourself a great deal of money.
  1. Don’t allow bare wires to remain exposed. Have old wiring professionally inspected.
  1. Don’t forget to give your building a thorough check-up every six months to ensure that it has a clean bill of health.

 

The Building Doctor Is In

Ohio Historical Soc.SIEDC is proud to announce a partnership with the Tiffin Historic Trust and the Seneca Regional Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Services to bring the Building Doctors, a program of the Ohio Historic Preservation Office, to Tiffin!

The Building Doctors will be hosting an informative two-hour seminar on caring for older buildings the evening of July 21 at the Tiffin-Seneca Public Library. This seminar will address issues such as peeling paint, failing plaster, wet basements, deteriorating masonry, damaged wood, window repair, and many other topics. Those interested in a consultation the following day must attend the seminar.

Friday, July 22, the Doctors will visit ten buildings to provide a free consultation. They are available to visit a variety of types of buildings built before 1955. Due to the limitedBuilding Doctor 1 number of consultations, applications are to be sent to SIEDC, and the SIEDC Downtown Design Committee will choose the top ten for the Doctors to visit.

Applications can be downloaded here, or picked up at the SIEDC office (19 W. Market St.). Please submit applications to Amy Reinhart. Be prepared to provide a picture of the structure and description of the issue.

Hannah Taulbee – Heidelberg Student and SIEDC Intern

Heritage Ohio Announces New Ohio Main Street Community

Ohio Main Street

Columbus, Ohio – Heritage Ohio, Inc. announced Tiffin has been selected as the newest community to join the Ohio Main Street Program. Tiffin has been participating in Heritage Ohio’s Downtown Affiliate Program, building the capacity needed to be successful in revitalizing downtown. The Seneca Industrial & Economic Development Corporation hosted a seven member selection committee on December 10. During the community review process SIEDC, the Tiffin Historic Trust, and various individuals and committee members had the opportunity to present their program of work as well as answer questions put forth by the selection committee. Tiffin will join an elite group of 23 additional communities dedicated to a comprehensive and highly successful trademarked Main Street revitalization strategy.

Current Ohio Main Street Programs include: Cambridge, Chardon, Defiance, Delaware, Findlay, Greenville, Warehouse District (Cleveland), Gateway Neighborhood (Cleveland), Kent, Lakewood, Lebanon, Marietta, Medina, Millersburg, Mt. Vernon, Norwalk, Painesville, Piqua, Portsmouth, Sandusky, Troy, Van Wert, Vermillion, Wooster,).

Main Street communities receive intensive training and technical support needed to restore their central and neighborhood business districts to centers of community activity and commerce. The assistance includes volunteer and program manager training, marketing and promotion, business recruitment, market analysis, design, historic preservation and fundraising. The Heritage Ohio Main Street Program will also conduct on-site visits to help each community develop its work program and plan for success.

“Tiffin has demonstrated a local commitment to establishing a downtown revitalization program as well as a very impressive partnership between the city, county, industry and colleges,” commented Joyce Barrett, Director of Heritage Ohio. SIEDC is planning an event for the public announcement.

The Heritage Ohio Main Street Program is modeled on the National Main Street Center’s comprehensive approach to downtown revitalization. Benefits of this program include renewed vitality of the downtown/district area along with enhanced economic performance. Today, the Main Street Program has been instituted in 43 states and over 2,050 communities. Nationwide, it has helped create 473,439 net new jobs and opened 109,664 net new businesses creating a total reinvestment of over $55 billion.

Heritage Ohio began, as Downtown Ohio, Inc., organized in 1989 is a statewide non-profit corporation that encourages the development, redevelopment and improvement of downtowns and neighborhood commercial district areas throughout Ohio. Heritage Ohio works as a catalyst for downtown and neighborhood district development by gathering together revitalization organizations, conducting statewide seminars and conferences and providing a network of members to share knowledge, common experiences and challenges concerning downtowns and neighborhood commercial districts. Heritage Ohio is dedicated to assisting self-motivated communities through technical assistance, training and networking in all facets of downtown and commercial district development. Heritage Ohio advocates for revitalization and historic preservation issues at the state and federal levels. Additionally, the organization publishes Revitalize Ohio, a quarterly statewide preservation/revitalization magazine. Membership in Heritage Ohio is available to any community, organization, corporation or individual interested in comprehensive downtown or commercial district revitalization.
For more information regarding the Heritage Ohio Main Street Program or assistance available to communities contact Heritage Ohio at 614.258.6200 or visit http://www.heritageohio.org.

Tiffin Art Fair & Art Walk this Saturday

2015_08_07 - Art Walk Map The Tiffin Summer Art Walk is this Saturday, August 8, from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., in conjunction with the Tiffin Art Fair at the courthouse green space and the Tiffin Art Guild. In addition, the Seneca County Farmers Market on South Washington Street will be extended until 4 p.m.

Throughout the day, walkers can visit Tiffin museums and galleries to view exhibits, take tours, create crafts and enter into drawings for door prizes. There are also 15 downtown businesses participating, with free live music, art displays and demonstrations, and tours.

The following museums and galleries are participating:

Along with the following businesses:2015_08_07 - Art Walk Guide

For a complete map and more information about the museums, galleries and businesses, click here.